People with High IQ’s are Good Language Learners?

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Intelligence quotient (IQ) is a measure of a person's cognitive abilities, which is often correlated with academic achievement and language learning. However, it is important to note that a high IQ does not necessarily guarantee success in language learning. As mentioned in the statement, Francois Gouin, a smart person, failed to use German in real conversation despite his attempts to learn the language. This indicates that IQ alone is not sufficient to become a successful language learner.


In addition, research has shown that other factors such as motivation, attitude, learning strategies, and exposure to the language play a crucial role in language learning. Inozu (2011) emphasized that a high IQ is not a requirement for being a good language learner. Instead, a good language learner is someone who is motivated, has a positive attitude towards learning, uses effective learning strategies, and is exposed to the language in meaningful ways.

Becoming a good language learner involves utilizing a variety of effective learning strategies. It is not just about having a high IQ, but rather about actively practicing and utilizing strategies that work best for the individual. Research has shown that a good language learner is someone who actively seeks clarification, verification, and meaning, as well as asks questions, makes inferences, and uses deduction (Ellis & Sinclair, 1989; Naiman et al., 1978; O'Malley et al., 1985; Oxford, 1990; Rubin, 1987; Stern, 1980; Rees-Miller, 1993).


In other words, a good language learner tends to be an active participant in the learning process, rather than a passive one. This means that they explore different strategies and techniques that work best for them and actively engage with the language in order to develop their skills. Ultimately, becoming a successful language learner requires a combination of factors, including cognitive abilities, motivation, attitude, learning strategies, and exposure to the language.


References



Inozu, J. (2011). Beliefs about foreign language learning among students training to teach English as a foreign language. Social Behavior and Personality: An International Journal, 39(5), 645–653.

Rees-Miller, J. (1993). A critical appraisal of learner training: Theoretical bases and teaching implications. TESOL Quarterly, 27(4), 679–689.

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